See Sustainable Elements on the Wellesley Kitchen Tour

Phyllis Theermann

fireplaceThis Saturday, May 3, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., grab friends, neighbors and family to see first hand some unique, sustainable aspects on the Wellesley Hills Junior Women’s Club Kitchen Tour.

Some folks are even biking the Tour this year!

Some highlights in and around the kitchens in Wellesley are listed below but go see for yourself!

172 Hampshire Roadcabinets

  • Trex decking and railings made of composite materials -95% recycled wood and plastic. It will last longer, which means not needing additional wood for replacement and won’t require additional painting.
  • Wool carpeting (natural material, no chemicals or off-gassing)
  • Wood cabinets are made by Pennville, a family-owned, Indiana company committed to the principal that “while using wood, our greatest renewable resource, leave as small a footprint on our environment as possible.”
  • Islands are Superwhite Quartzite and Caesarstone. Quartz is a naturally abundant mineral and Caesarstone’s sustainability practices are listed here.

77 Chesterton Road

Reclaimed door from one of the oldest hardware stores in America.  Formerly the door to the storage room, now with a distressed finish to coordinate with the color of the study walls and hung  on an industrial type track.

Reclaimed door from one of the oldest hardware stores in America. Formerly the door to the storage room, now with a distressed finish to coordinate with the color of the study walls and hung on an industrial type track.

One of the owners of this home is a LEED certified builder (Riverstone Custom Builders, LLC) who is very focused on re-using and re-purposing and putting as little as possible into landfills. Behind the scenes of the beauty and comfort of this kitchen and home, the home is wrapped in closed cell foam and has a highly efficient air exchange with filters.  Some of the beautiful re-claimed materials used in this home, not only adds character to it, but is also a money saver.

80 Livingston Road

  • All flooring is from reclaimed wood. Specifically, the flooring in the family room that is from a tree in Cambridge that was being cut down by the city.  Instead of having it chipped, they turned it into flooring.
  • Geothermal heating system for heating and cooling
  • Structural insulated panels for the walls.

Many of these, and other homes in Wellesley, are making efforts to make their homes more sustainable with spray in insulation –to achieve the highest level of r-factor, new windows, and LED lights that are 90% more efficient than incandescent. In addition, you will see on this tour and around town lots of low and no VOC (volatile organic compounds) paints, dual flush toilets that save water, rain barrels, and much more.

Why are they doing it?

“It was incredibly important to me to make sustainable choices when it came to renovating our house and what I learned through the process is that it’s fairly easy to do,” said Jessica Stanton, homeowner on the kitchen tour. “We worked with an architect (Marshall McLean, MMA) and Paul Bevilacqua (Bevilacqua Builders) who were well versed in the area and were able to help us navigate this fairly easily. You realize given the amount of building that’s going on in Wellesley right now how much of an impact we all are having on our environment. Renovating an older home was important to me as an alternative to just tearing it down. We love the character of our house and knew we could do simple things that would reduce the environmental impact of our renovations,” Stanton said.

Ticket prices are $30 when purchased in advance, and are $40 when purchased at the door. Buy tickets here. All proceeds benefit local charities and scholarship programs.

 

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Phyllis Theermann
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