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Sustainable Wellesley members gathered in front of the Wellesley Community Center holding signs, and wearing safety vests and tape measures of the sort used by utility crews to draw attention to National Grid’s lack of action on gas leaks. The community center is located near a major leak that has been known to the gas company since 2015.

Last week, Sustainable Wellesley called on National Grid to fix the dozens of persistent gas leaks in Wellesley. The leaks emit vast amounts of methane, which is a dangerous and highly potent greenhouse gas that is contributing to global warming.

Sustainable Wellesley President Quentin Prideaux said, “We first started looking at gas leaks in Wellesley in 2015 when there were 197 leaks reported by National Grid — now there are 261. The leaks are actually getting worse and we need National Grid to step up to protect our climate, our safety, and our health.”

The Sustainable Wellesley action was part of a larger effort across the Boston metropolitan area led by Mothers Out Front, the Gas Leaks Allies, and other environmental groups frustrated by the lack of progress on gas leaks. In Boston, more than 100 protesters gathered on Cambridge Street near a 13-year old leak. Activists are particularly concerned that National Grid has backed away from its previous commitment to identify and repair the largest volume leaks, sometimes called “super-emitters.” These large volume leaks make up only about 7 percent of the more than 16,000 leaks in the state but they emit roughly 50 percent of the methane. The other large gas companies — Eversource and Columbia Gas — have already begun using the accepted method for identifying and repairing these leaks, while National Grid has said it will not do so until next year.

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A compressor station is like an enormous gas leak, but worse in many, many ways.

You are invited to the State House at noon TOMORROW, August 5th, to stop the proposed compressor station for Weymouth, a community already overburdened by industry and infrastructure.

For details, please read this message from Mass Power Forward…

“We cannot have any new fossil fuel infrastructure in our state, and we must be rapidly dismantling the current system. That’s why the proposal to build an explosive gas compressor station in the Fore River Basin is insult on injury.

Governor Baker promised to do 3 more studies before issuing permits for the Weymouth Compressor Station, and he’s already issued the air permit. We believe it is likely the other permits may be coming by August 5th.

Join us as we push him to keep his promises, and NO “rubber stamp” permits for Weymouth!

Like in 2017, we will assemble in the hallway outside his office in the statehouse. Please arrive with enough time to get thru security and take the stairs or elevator to the 3rd floor.

PLEASE SIGN UP HERE SO WE CAN GET A HEAD COUNT

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We applaud all of you that came up with creative ways to reduce your plastic usage in July. Keep it up!

This month, we thought we would start discussing something many of us don’t think about when it comes to plastic waste reduction (climate change and greenhouse gases too)…FASHION.

All of us, approximately 8 billion people globally, need fabrics. After water and food it is a top necessity but did you know that approximately 64% of our clothes are made from plastics (polyester, acrylic and nylon)?  Plastics are byproducts of fossil fuel and to convert fossil fuel into fabrics, significant amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) are released.

By sharing some facts about plastics in our clothing and best practices, we hope to encourage a discussion that helps reduce our carbon footprints. Feel free to share your ideas at info@sustainablewellesley.com.

One option is to discourage production of new synthetic fabrics by reusing, repurposing and redesigning what we already have and introducing the concept of circular economy in fashion.

Another option is up-cycling — instead of only re-cycling. By mixing old synthetic fabrics with other old fabrics embellishes the new product and creates new markets for beautiful clothing, hand-woven floor mats, bathroom mats, house shoes, ribbons and more.

Luckily, there are fashion designers out  there using their creativity to repurpose the plastics we already have created, instead of sending old clothes to landfills and oceans. Consider buying these types of products instead of brand new items.

For example, leading fashion brands and manufacturers are working to transform the way they produce jeans, tackling waste, pollution, and the use of harmful practices. By doing this, we can create a circular economy and produce sustainable fashion. Learn more about it here and watch the video here.

Finally, don’t forget there is a consignment shop here in Wellesley and many in neighboring towns such as this one in Natick and few in Needham and Newton too where you can find pre-loved fashion and reduce the amount of plastic created. There are many children and men’s consignment shops as well.

We welcome your creative ideas and suggestions. Write to us at info@sustainablewellesley.com.

Big thanks to Enku for inspiring this blog post and bringing this important topic to light with research, as well as Kelly for some good tips!