Milkweed for Monarchs

Now Accepting Orders!

We had a huge amount of interest in 2016 again, so thank you! We are starting up again for 2017, so place an order and we will let you know when the plants are big enough to ship from our suppliers (we are told June). We had very good reports of members growing milkweed and seeing Monarch butterflies come visit so we look forward to more this year.

This is an important fund-raiser for Sustainable Wellesley, we accept donations of $5 for each ‘plug’ of milkweed. You can also buy the plants at cost ($2.00 each) because we want everyone to be able to take part. Each plant is a short plug that has been truncated for shipping, but it will grow quickly.  We recommend 2-4 plugs to get milkweed established in your yard.  It prefers full sun and average-moisture soil, and it will grow….like a weed….but without invasive root propagation so you should have no trouble.

You will need to collect your plugs from an address in Wellesley.

Select the price below and click the ‘Add to Cart’ button. You can pay with a credit card or a PayPal account.
On the PayPal screen enter the number of milkweed plugs you want – we recommend at least 2-4 plugs to get started.If you have any questions send an email to monarchs@sustainablewellesley.com and thanks!


Prices



Milkweed For Monarchs

Sustainable Wellesley is helping residents do their part to support the Monarch butterfly – by sourcing milkweed for you to put in your yard.  Monarch populations are crashing and one reason is the lack of milkweed that Monarch caterpillars *must* eat to survive.  And milkweed is a beautiful pink and white plant that attracts even more beautiful butterflies to your home!

milkweed and plant

Amazingly enough,

Monarchs can produce four generations during one summer. After overwintering in the oyamel forests of central Mexico the first three generations have life spans of two to six weeks and keep moving north. During this time they will mate and have the next generation that will continue the northward migration. The fourth generation is different and can live up to nine months, and this is the one that needs to find milkweed in your yard. These are also the butterflies that will migrate south for winter to either Mexico or southern California.

Capture

Monarch numbers have plummeted…

…by 90 percent in recent years from both the loss of its overwintering grounds, and from the widespread elimination of milkweed in the United States by the use of herbicides like Roundup.  This is where you come in: by planting milkweed in your (herbicide-free, pesticide-free) yard you provide the vital link in the Monarch lifecycle.  Each year Sustainable Wellesley sources the correct species of milkweed for eastern Massachusetts (Asclepias incarnata) and makes it available to beautiful butterfly breeders like you.

2014

Our first foray into Milkweed For Monarchs started because Quentin couldn’t find proper indigenous milkweed anywhere. He tracked down our first (wonderful but remote) suppliers in Kansas and bought two “flats” of 64 plants total. We gave away 40 plants to happy Sustainable Wellesley members.

2015

We had a fabulous year for the butterflies in 2015!  More than 60 homes in Wellesley signed up for Milkweed For Monarchs and together you planted well over 200 plants!  This more than 5x the volume of 2014 so that is very exciting.  We also switched to charging for the plants – either cost or a small markup and this was very successful. Reports are coming in of hardy, attractive plants growing well, and most importantly Monarch butterflies spotted taking advantage of the bounty.

2016

We provided a record 228 plants to happy Sustainable Wellesley members and friends, and we are delighted that Green Newton started their own program modeled on ours. We look forward to hearing how your plants are doing!

Please send any questions to info@sustainablewellesley.com, and do join the discussion in the comments section below.  Let us know how your plants are doing and if you’ve seen any butterflies.

9 Comments

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    • 3:32 pm - May 19, 2017

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    • 2:20 am - May 17, 2017

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  • Jim P

    I ordered and paid for 5 milkweed plants on PayPal on July 17 and have had no response since then. I stopped by the Wellesley Farmer’s Market every Saturday over the last month hoping to connect with someone there because my emails have gone unanswered. Please let me know where I can pick them up so I can get them in the ground ASAP. Or kindly process a refund through PayPal. Thank you.

    Jim

    • 6:15 pm - October 20, 2016

    • Reply
    • Quentin

      Quentin

      Glad that we were able to sort this out for you! Do let us know how they do in the Spring.
      All the best
      Quentin

      • 6:43 pm - December 20, 2016

  • kimberlee dow

    Trying to make a purchase for 2017 and the buy now button is not working? Should I just try again later?
    thanks
    kim

    • 3:14 pm - August 3, 2016

    • Reply
    • Quentin

      Quentin

      I think you were able to order now?
      All the best
      Quentin

      • 6:43 pm - December 20, 2016

  • Michael W. Adams

    Are they still available this late?

    • 8:45 am - June 25, 2016

    • Reply
  • Janet King

    One “incarnata” plant from Quentin came up beautifully this spring! already reddish blossom-buds on it. Since they like it swampy, I cannot have high expectations, though.
    Then I have many of the “syriaca” ??? (common) variety with the broader, rounder leaves and flowers are starting there as well. At the start of our dead-end street (1/10 mile long) there are more, and on the college campus across Rt 16, yet another bunch. national Grid is starting road work to replace pipes but I have asked the powers-that-be to please protect the darlings! No butterflies yet — is it too early?

    • 3:07 pm - June 9, 2016

    • Reply

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