Phyllis Theermann

                                                 

If you missed the Conversations with the Candidates and Community Dinner on Sunday, don’t worry. We have you covered.

{You did miss a fun and enlightening evening though}

Click on the Board name below to read the thoughtful responses most candidates offered to Sustainable Wellesley’s questions.

Since many of the races are contested, knowing what the candidates value will help you when you go to vote.

After reading them, share your thoughts with family, friends and neighbors.

**Make sure you have time on your calendar on Tuesday, March 5th to vote or get an absentee ballot from Town Hall. Absentee requests may be filed up until noon the day prior, but if you require the ballot to be mailed out of Wellesley please allow sufficient time for mailing in both directions (generally allow 10 mailing days for a ballot to go out of Wellesley and be returned).

Moderator
Selectmen – contested
Assessors
Board of Health – contested
Housing Authority
Library Trustees 
Natural Resources Commission – contested
Planning Board –contested
Dept. of Public Works
Recreation Department – contested
School Committee

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Public Forum

525 Washington Street, Great Hall, 2nd Floor

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

7:00pm

The Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) is hosting a public forum on Tuesday, February 13th at 7pm in the Great Hall at Town Hall, to inform the public and gather community input on a greenhouse gas reduction study that the WMLP has undertaken with the assistance of consultants from the Analysis Group.  The WMLP Board and lead consultant, Paul Hibbard, will be on hand to discuss the study and solicit comments from the public.  The forum will be taped and made available on the Wellesley Cable Channel. If you can’t attend on February 13, please share your ideas by contacting the Wellesley MLP.

Probably not.

trees at country club

But if they love trees like the rest of us then why is the Wellesley Country Club destroying so many of them?  The club has already cut down over 80 trees that were outside of the town’s jurisdiction, and is now headed to the Wetlands Protection Committee this coming Thursday, March 30, 6:30 p.m. to ask for permission to remove another 67 trees that are in wetlands.

The club offers a number of reasons for this widespread tree removal – some of the trees are in decline, some interfere with play and some are invasive species.  But one driving force behind the plan seems to be a problem with fungus on the turf that they say can only be dealt with by either the application of pesticides or by removing trees so that better air circulation can eliminate it.

There is a problem with both of these strategies. First, using pesticides in a wetland area is not a healthy, safe approach. Secondly, if better air circulation creates a drier environment that will kill off the fungus, then it seems it will also dry up – and eliminate – the wetland.  Fungus is a naturally occurring growth and does especially well in damp environments – like a wetland.

At a time when people around our planet are working hard to save and plant more trees in order to stave off climate change, it just seems wrong to be cutting them down for “interfering with play”.

A quick look at articles in the USGA magazine, November 6, 2015 issue, reveals that this is a growing trend on golf courses nationwide.  Trees are viewed as obstacles to the game and not appreciated for the beauty, shade and habitat they provide (not to mention oxygen).  This outlook runs counter to common sense and treats trees as if they were merely furniture and not the living, breathing beings that they are.

The Country Club is a beautiful open space.  It’s beauty however, comes mainly from its trees.

If you are passionate about trees and preserving as many as we can in our town, please come to the wetlands hearing – Thursday, March 30 in the office of the Natural Resources Commission, Town Hall.  Public Voice begins at 6:30 p.m.