Phyllis Theermann

Shout out to the Wellesley Middle School Girl Scouts who worked in partnership with the Wellesley Natural Resources Commission to show how trees improve air quality. The girl scouts calculated the data and then placed informative labels on public trees along Central Street in Wellesley Square. You can use the i-Tree MyTree app to explore the individual benefits provided by the trees near you.

 

Top Row – left to right
Julia Andersson
Ginger Gooch
Eliza Towle
Ellie Owens
Julia Pekowitz
tree
Katie Stuart
Alexa Pekowitz
Tracey Peng
Samantha Chiu

Bottom Row – left to right
Sophia Russo
Caroline Kane
Lucy Kim
Sofia Dobado
Michelle Cunningham

Phyllis Theermann


Important issues are happening in our community. Use your voting rights to elect people you believe in. Local politics does affect your day-to-day lives so don’t forget to make time on March 6th to vote.

Sustainable Wellesley asked all of the candidates to answer a few questions about sustainability and how it relates to the work of that particular board. Here are many of their thoughts. Remember most of these positions are for 3-5 years.

Board of Assessors – No response.
Board of Health – Click here.
Board of Public Works – No response.

Board of Selectmen – Click here.
Library Trustees – Click here.
Moderator – No response.

Natural Resources – Click here.
Planning Board – Click here.
Recreation Commission – Click here.

School Committee – Click here.
Town Clerk – Click here.

Please share widely with your friends and neighbors — and please VOTE!

See and hear from the candidates at the upcoming League of Women Voter’s Candidates Eve, Thursday, March 1st.

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Probably not.

trees at country club

But if they love trees like the rest of us then why is the Wellesley Country Club destroying so many of them?  The club has already cut down over 80 trees that were outside of the town’s jurisdiction, and is now headed to the Wetlands Protection Committee this coming Thursday, March 30, 6:30 p.m. to ask for permission to remove another 67 trees that are in wetlands.

The club offers a number of reasons for this widespread tree removal – some of the trees are in decline, some interfere with play and some are invasive species.  But one driving force behind the plan seems to be a problem with fungus on the turf that they say can only be dealt with by either the application of pesticides or by removing trees so that better air circulation can eliminate it.

There is a problem with both of these strategies. First, using pesticides in a wetland area is not a healthy, safe approach. Secondly, if better air circulation creates a drier environment that will kill off the fungus, then it seems it will also dry up – and eliminate – the wetland.  Fungus is a naturally occurring growth and does especially well in damp environments – like a wetland.

At a time when people around our planet are working hard to save and plant more trees in order to stave off climate change, it just seems wrong to be cutting them down for “interfering with play”.

A quick look at articles in the USGA magazine, November 6, 2015 issue, reveals that this is a growing trend on golf courses nationwide.  Trees are viewed as obstacles to the game and not appreciated for the beauty, shade and habitat they provide (not to mention oxygen).  This outlook runs counter to common sense and treats trees as if they were merely furniture and not the living, breathing beings that they are.

The Country Club is a beautiful open space.  It’s beauty however, comes mainly from its trees.

If you are passionate about trees and preserving as many as we can in our town, please come to the wetlands hearing – Thursday, March 30 in the office of the Natural Resources Commission, Town Hall.  Public Voice begins at 6:30 p.m.